CCAGW Annual Ratings

2019 Congressional Ratings

Since 1989, the Council for Citizens Against Government Waste (CCAGW) has examined roll call votes to help identify which members of Congress have defended taxpayer interests and which have backed away from their promises of fiscal responsibility. The Congressional Ratings separate the praiseworthy from the profligate by evaluating important tax, spending, transparency, and accountability measures. CCAGW applauds those members of Congress who stand up for taxpayers and ignore the temptations of satisfying local or special interests. However, those who support a big-government agenda should be prepared to face the consequences for their spendthrift behavior.

CCAGW’s 2019 Congressional Ratings, for the first session of the 116th Congress, score 80 votes in the House of Representatives and 12 votes in the Senate. By comparison, CCAGW rated 55 votes in the House of Representatives and 12 votes in the Senate in the second session of the 115th Congress.

CCAGW rates members on a 0-100 percent scale. Members are placed in the following categories: 0-19 percent, Hostile; 20-39 percent, Unfriendly; 40-59 percent, Lukewarm; 60-79 percent, Friendly; 80-99 percent, Taxpayer Hero; and 100 percent, Taxpayer Super Hero.

House and Senate Breakdown

For 2019, there are 14 Taxpayer Heroes in the Senate, the same as in 2018. There are 135 Taxpayer Heroes in the House of Representatives, 23 percent less than the 176 Taxpayer Heroes in 2018.

At the other end of the spectrum, 38 senators and 34 representatives have a score of zero. In 2018, 24 senators and 7 representatives had a score of zero.

Victories

House

Passage of the United State-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA). H.R. 5430, which would ratify the USMCA, modernizing outdated North American free trade practices, protecting intellectual property, and boosting automotive production and wages, passed by a vote of 385-41.

Senate

Rejection of the Green New Deal. S. J. Res. 8, which urged adoption of the Green New Deal, was unanimously rejected by a vote of 0-57.

Rejection of a Resolution to Nullify President Trump’s Guidance on Section 1332 State Health Waivers. S. J. Res. 52, which would disapprove of the Trump administration’s criteria for evaluating Sec. 1332 state health care plan waivers under Obamacare, was rejected by a vote of 43-52.

Rejection of a Resolution to Nullify the Internal Revenue Service’s Guidance on Allowable Charitable Contribution Deductions. S. J. Res. 50, which would disapprove of the Trump administration’s rule regarding contributions in exchange for state or local tax credits, was rejected by a vote of 43-52.

Losses

House

Passage of the Bipartisan Budget of Act of 2019. H.R. 3877, which would raise budget caps by $324 billion over the next two fiscal years, passed by a vote of 284-149.

Passage of the Lower Drug Costs Now Act. H.R. 3, which would exert an unprecedented amount of government control over the biopharmaceutical industry, stifle competition, use price controls that would cause costs to increase, and smother the development of new, innovative medicines, passed by a vote of 230-192.

Passage of the Save the Internet Act of 2019. H.R. 1644, which would undo the Federal Communications Commission’s 2017 Restoring Internet Freedom Order that ended the 2015 Open Internet Order, more commonly known as net neutrality, passed by a vote of 232-190.

Senate

Passage of the Bipartisan Budget of Act of 2019. H.R. 3877, which would raise budget caps by $324 billion over the next two fiscal years, passed by a vote of 67-28.

Rejection of the Balanced Budget Amendment and Budget Caps. During consideration of H.R. 3877, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019, an amendment offered by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) to ratify a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, decrease budget caps, and place limits on tax increases, was rejected by a vote of 23-70.

Across-the-Board Cut to Appropriations Bill. An amendment offered by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) during consideration of H.R. 3055, the Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2020, and Further Health Extenders Act of 2019, to cut 2 percent less than amount of funding made available in Fiscal Year 2019, was rejected by a vote of 24-67.

Further Analysis

CCAGW also analyzed ratings based on party affiliation and House membership in the Republican Study Committee.

The averages were: Senate Republicans – 64 percent, down 7 percentage points from 71 percent in 2018; Senate Democrats, including Independents – 4 percent, down 1 percentage point from 5 percent in 2018; House Republicans – 89 percent, up 6 percentage points from 83 percent in 2018; House Democrats – 2 percent, down 6 percentage points from 8 percent in 2018; House Republican Study Committee – 93 percent, up 7 percentage points from 86 percent in 2018.

CCAGW congratulates the members who stood by taxpayers and championed fiscal responsibility throughout the first session of the 116th Congress and encourages the constituents of the non-Taxpayer Heroes to demand better results from their elected officials.